Wednesday, September 12, 2012

This is part of something that started in 2010 and still goes on. I'll post the whole thing slowly as it comes along.


PARENTS

I like cold hands on my face. 
I am five years old and I anxiously wait for my mom to come back from work. She is a nurse and often makes house calls in the afternoons. I imagine the awful things she must be doing to her patients; needles, swabs, rubbing gross ointments on their wounds. I hate the word "ointment". And "cream". When she comes home she stands shivering in our red wallpapered hallway wearing her thin coat and pink felt toque and I run up to her and hug her. She presses her cold face against mine and kisses me. I love that feeling every time. 

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My father is a sailor. When I am finally born my mother sends him a telegram asking him to return from the sea, and he does.

My father's early CD collection consists of Julio Iglesias and Ozzy Ozbourne. It is simultaneously super cool and embarrassing to have my friends browse through it when they come over. Dad blasts Iglesias on quiet Saturday afternoons for everyone on the street to hear because since the very beginning of his childhood he always wanted to be seen as a rebel. It is a vain attempt because most of our neighbours are Sephardic Jews and they really enjoy that kind of music. I am proud of my dad, he is tall and strong, has long wavy hair tied in a pony tail and he drives a red car to work. I don't realize then that all those are glaring signs of a mid-life crisis. 

Later on he really gets into the Allman Brothers and we begin shopping for music together in the nearby town. On the drive home we listen to Nina Simone really loud and he gives me a smoke as we speed along the Mediterranean shore in his red car. It makes him feel like a cool young dad and I feel like some sort of a fucked up teenage outsider from a Terrence Malick film. I don't even like Terrence Malick but I still smoke the cigarettes with secret pride. My mom doesn't get involved because she knows how much those afternoons mean to both of us.

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